Posts Tagged ‘ cavities ’

What is A Cavity?

Thursday, August 4th, 2016
cavity

So what exactly are cavities and how do they develop?

I’m sure you’re all too familiar with the world cavity if you’ve been alive on this planet for some time. The word itself carries a negative weight so palpable, we’re sure you remember all the methods to prevent them from grade school. So, with all this emphasis we put on ridding our oral cavities of these suckers, so we actually know what they are? In this week’s blog, we’ll answer that question for you! Read on with us as we explore what exactly a cavity is, how they form, and why they’re so detrimental to your continued dental health.

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What Are “Hidden” Sugars and How Can They Hurt Your Teeth?

Monday, February 1st, 2016
You know this is horrible for your teeth, but so are many other foods and drinks that you think are harmless!

You know this is horrible for your teeth, but so are many other foods and drinks that you think are harmless!

Even though you know how bad sugar is for your teeth, and even though you go to great lengths to avoid it in great quantities, the sad fact is that even passing up candy, ice cream and cake isn’t necessarily enough to ward off cavities and other sugar-related tooth issues. Many foods have “hidden” sugars that will cause cavities and tooth decay just as surely as downing spoonfuls of unadulterated sugars will. Learning what those foods are will help in the never-ending fight against cavities. (more…)

How Can You Best Prevent Cavities?

Monday, January 18th, 2016
dental care

The importance of preventing cavities should be stressed from an early age

For as far back as y0u can remember – starting well before your first regular dental checkups – the word “cavity” has been used as an all-purpose dirty word for what you most want to avoid in your teeth. Even now, as an adult, the word carries horrible connotations, and you surely warn your own children about the dreaded “c-word.” (more…)

Preventing Cavities with Sweet Tooth

Thursday, November 19th, 2015
Brush after eating sweets

Don’t deny yourself your sweet treat. You can have your cake and eat it too. As long as you brush afterward!

The term “sweet tooth” was coined in the 1300s when people described someone with a liking for delicacies, sweet or not, as having a sweet tooth. Over time the phrase began to refer to people who enjoyed sweets after refined sugar was introduced after explorations in the tropics of Asia. Today the term is used for people who experience cravings for sweets. But what happens when these sweets turn dangerous and give you cavities? Well, we’re in luck. We can help protect you from these cavities so you can have your cake and eat it too! (more…)

How to Prevent Cavities

Friday, August 14th, 2015
Cavity Prevention

To help minimize the damage of cavities, see your dentist regularly!

The word “cavity” actually refers to the hole or structural damage to a tooth that is caused by bacteria. Bacteria attacks the two outer layers of your teeth called the enamel and dentin. These layers help to protect the soft living tissue underneath. This tissue is called the pulp. Is there a way to protect your teeth from getting cavities? Let’s explore the causes, symptoms, and prevention! (more…)

Common Childhood Dental Problems

Friday, June 12th, 2015
pediatric dentistry problems

When it comes to pediatric dentistry, the problems are unique.

When it comes to your children, dental hygiene is as important, if not more important. Their teeth are fragile, and problems early on can lead to a lifetime of issues. Once those teeth start to show up, it’s time to start teaching your little one how to take care of them. Even still, problems can arise. What are the most common childhood dental problems that kids experience? Most pediatric dentists report cavities and tooth trauma as the most common issue your child may experience with their teeth. (more…)

Your Catonsville Dentist Explains What Causes Cavities

Thursday, August 7th, 2014

catonsville cavityKids aren’t the only ones who get cavities (though they tend to corner the market on how many cavities they get). Many adults also get cavities on a fairly regular basis. In fact, approximately 92% of adults ages 20-64 have had a cavity in their permanent teeth – unfortunately, 23% of them go untreated. Untreated cavities and decay can cause infections and other problems if they’re allowed to fester for long enough. One of the goals of dentists is to lower the amount of cavities that children and adults present with. The best way to prevent cavities is to know how they’re caused and what you can do to avoid getting them.

What Causes Cavities?

Tooth decay is the primary cause of cavities, so the more appropriate question is what causes tooth decay?

  • Sugar – You’ve heard that sugary drinks and candies can cause cavities and tooth decay – it’s most certainly true, but it’s not the sugar itself that causes the problem. The bigger problem is that the sugar leaves substances that bacteria like to eat. They can cover your teeth in acid, which will eventually break down your teeth and cause decay. Try eating sugar free candy or doing your best to avoid sugar altogether.
  • Acidic Foods – Fruit juice and citrus fruits are the worst for this. The best way to avoid letting them cause decay is to immediately brush after you eat or to chew gum with xylitol. Gum does double duty. It helps to get the food that’s stuck off of your teeth (and from in between) and also helps you produce more saliva. Your saliva works as an agent to combat acid left on your teeth.
  • Poor Oral Hygiene – It doesn’t matter how well you eat if you’re not taking care of your mouth. Brushing your teeth makes it difficult for bacteria and plaque to eat away at the enamel of your teeth. It can help harden them and leave a protective layer of fluoride that plaque has a hard time getting through. Brushing and flossing regularly will help you keep your teeth longer and avoid cavities.
  • Age – There’s obviously nothing you can do about this one, but it’s important to note that you can develop cavities as a result of getting older. Most older adults are surprised to find that they’re more susceptible to cavities since the common conception is that children are the most likely to develop them. Older adults lack saliva, frequently have some type of gum disease, and occasionally take medications that cause enamel to break down.

Having Your Cavities Treated

If you’re suffering from mouth pain and think it’s the result of a cavity, you need to see your Catonsville dentist ASAP to get it taken care of. Tooth decay can lead to more tooth decay, which can eventually cause you to lose your teeth altogether. Please make an appointment to see your Catonsville dentist if you feel that you have a cavity. You can contact Leikin & Baylin Dental Care of Catonsville, Maryland by calling 410-747-1115 or visiting CatonsvilleDentalCare.com.

Source: How Stuff Works, NIDCR

Disclaimer: The writer of this article is not a medical professional. Information contained herein has been collected from sources believed to be reliable, and every precaution has been taken to ensure its accuracy. The information provided here is for general informational purposes only, and should not be used as a substitute for professional medical care.

How Do I Know if I Have a Cavity? FAQs answered by your Catonsville Dentist

Monday, January 14th, 2013

A cavity occurs as the result of tooth decay, which is the destruction of the tooth structure because of plaque buildup.

When foods containing carbohydrates are left on your teeth for an extended period of time, bacteria living in your mouth begin to digest this food, turning them into acids. Then, the acid mixes with the bacteria, food debris, and saliva to form plaque. It is this plaque that eats away at your tooth enamel, creating cavities.

How Do I Know if I Have a Cavity?

Symptoms of cavities include:

  1. Visible holes in your teeth
  2. Toothache
  3. Sensitivity to hots and colds

If you believe you have a cavity, the only way to know for sure is to visit your local dentist, like Dr. Leikin and Dr. Baylin here at Leikin & Baylin Dental Care of Catonsville, Maryland. We offer high quality, comprehensive dental care. We set a very high standard for our care and we are very proud of the treatment that we have provided for you.

“We are a team of caring health professionals who provide unparalleled dental excellence and treat our patients as members of our family.”

Despite being almost entirely preventable, cavities are the most common infectious disease among children. And, for the first time in 40 years, instances of cavities in children are the rise!

In addition to offering unequaled dental excellence, Dr. Leikin and Dr. Baylin also offer pediatric dental care, ensuring your child feels as comfortable as possible. We make going to the dentist fun for your child!

If you have any questions about Cavities and Oral Health or wish to schedule an appointment, please contact Leikin & Baylin Dental Care of Catonsville, Maryland by calling 410-747-1115 or visit CatonsvilleDentalCare.com.

You can also follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

Source: Dental Health and Cavities

Hidden sugars can lead to cavities

Thursday, May 10th, 2012

Sugar is your teeth’s worst enemy. Most people think that by passing up candy, ice cream and even cake that you can avoid sugar.

However, it’s foods that have “high fructose corn syrup” or hidden sugars found in seemingly harmless foods that can also cause cavities.

Hidden Sugars

Oatmeal: Avoid the pre- packaged, flavor variety packets and dress up your oatmeal with nuts and fruit.

Protein Bars: Unsalted almonds or peanuts are a healthier choice.

Salad Dressing: Low fat salad dressing can be chock-full of sugar. Go for vinegar or lemon juice with olive oil instead.

Granola: There’s a health-halo effect for granola. People think that by munching on it, it can help your diet. However, it’s thickly coated with sugar. Opt out of it for a healthier option, like actual fruits.

Milk: All milk has sugar in it, so be wary when you pair it with sugary cereals. It may not bode well with your dental health.

Iced Tea: Unsweetened tea is your best option since natural tea doesn’t have any sugars. Sweet teas are filled to the brim with sugar.

Sports Drinks: It’s a great way to quench your thirst after a long work out but it’s not as healthy as you think it is. One drink has 310 calories. You would need to run several miles to burn that off.

If you have any questions about Cavities and how to prevent them, or wish to schedule an appointment, please contact Leikin & Baylin Dental Care of Catonsville, Maryland by calling 410-747-1115 or visit CatonsvilleDentalCare.com.

“We are a team of caring health professionals who provide unparalleled dental excellence and treat our patients as members of our family.”

You can also follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.