Posts Tagged ‘ Dental Health ’

What Causes Cavities and How Can They Be Prevented?

Thursday, January 23rd, 2014

Did you know that cavities are the most common infectious disease in children? And for the first time in 40 years, cavities, also known as dental caries, are on the rise.Dental examine

What Causes Cavities?

Cavities, as well as other forms of tooth decay, are caused bacteria in the mouth. When the conditions are just right, these bacteria begin producing acids, which contribute to loss of tooth enamel and eventual tooth decay.

Over time, this decay begins to eat away at the living material inside of the tooth. This is what we refer to as a cavity.

How can Cavities be prevented?

Cavity prevention is relatively simple, comprising of routine dental care.

  1. Oral Hygiene: Brushing (twice a day) and flossing (once a day) are crucial in the prevention of cavities and tooth decay. And remember to take your time. A good tooth-brushing takes at least 2 minutes.
  2. Nutrition: Avoid foods with high sugar content. Sugary foods encourage bacterial growth and acid.
  3. Dentist Visits: Dr. Leikin and Dr. Baylin of Leikin & Baylin Dental Care of Catonsville offer high quality, comprehensive dental care, including regular dental visits, preventative treatments, fillings, aesthetic restorations, and more!

How are Cavities treated?

  1. Remineralization: The use of fluoride can help reverse the decay associated with shallow cavities.
  2. Fillings: If a cavity is too large to be remineralized, but still small enough to not require more extreme treatments, it may be treated using a filling.
  3. Crowns: If the cavity is more severe, the tooth may be covered using a crown.
  4. Root Canal: If the cavity has extended to the center of the tooth and has infected the nerve, a root canal will probably be required.
  5. Extraction: If the tooth decay is extreme enough, the tooth will need to be removed.

If you have any questions about Cavities, or wish to schedule an appointment, please contact Leikin & Baylin Dental Care of Catonsville, Maryland by calling 410-747-1115 or visit CatonsvilleDentalCare.com.

Dr. Leikin and Dr. Baylin of Leikin & Baylin Dental Care of Catonsville offer high quality, comprehensive dental care.

You can also follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

Sources:

Cavities Making a Comeback

Researchers discover Link between Dental Health & Alzheimer’s Disease

Tuesday, August 6th, 2013

Dental HealthAccording to researchers from the University of Central Lancashire School of Medicine and Dentistry, poor dental health, gum disease, and Alzheimer’s disease may be linked. While this is not the first study to predict a link between dental health and dementia, it is the first study to “pinpoint a specific gum disease bacteria in the brain.” Researchers found Porphyromonas gingivalis in four of their 10 donated brain samples and believe this bacterium may play a role in Alzheimer’s disease development.

“We are working on the theory that when the brain is repeatedly exposed to bacteria and/or debris from our gums, subsequent immune responses may lead to nerve cell death and possibly memory loss,” said Sim Singhrao, PhD, a senior research fellow at the University of Central Lancashire School of Medicine and Dentistry. “The future of the research aims to discover if P. gingivalis can be used as a marker, via a simple blood test, to predict the development of Alzheimer’s disease in at-risk patients.”

However, more research is needed. As St John Crean, dean of the School of Medicine and Dentistry, explains, the link between poor dental hygiene and dementia has yet to be proven.

“We don’t know whether the presence of these bacteria in the brain contributes to the disease, and further research will be needed to investigate this,” said Simon Ridley, PhD, head of research at Alzheimer’s Research U.K.

“This small study suggests that we need more research into this important area,” added Alison Cook, director of external affairs at the U.K.’s Alzheimer’s Society.

While there is still no definitive proof of the link between dental health and Alzheimer’s disease, one thing is for sure; good oral health is important.

If you have any questions about the Link between Dental Health, Gum Disease, & Alzheimer’s, or wish to schedule an appointment, please contact Leikin & Baylin Dental Care of Catonsville, Maryland by calling 410-747-1115 or visit CatonsvilleDentalCare.com. You can also follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

Sources:

Can Poor Dental Health Cause Dementia? WebMD

How to Tell If You Might Need A Root Canal

Monday, May 20th, 2013

There are multiple signs that a tooth may need a root canal. To understand why you may need a root canal, first you need to understand the characteristics of your teeth. Teeth are “tough” on the outside, but inside they have a soft core called a nerve chamber. This inner core is made up of nerve tissue and blood vessels that feed the nerve. If a nerve degenerates completely the tissues die and gangrene develops. The nerve chamber may also become infected in some cases.

A tooth needs a root canal when the nerve of the tooth becomes infected. A tooth may be infected if it is sensitive to hot, cold, or chewing, causes pain or swelling, keeps you awake at night, creates a bad taste in your mouth, or you may have no symptoms at all. When a root canal is done, your symptoms will dissipate because the nerve will have been removed from the tooth.

Here are a few tips to noticing if you need a root canal:

  • If you notice toothache pain – A lot of people who need a root canal notice a shooting pain in their teeth first. This is usually exacerbated by the chewing of food.
  • Sensitive to hot and cold – If you’re ultra sensitive to both hot and cold liquids or foods, this is another sign that you may need a root canal. Your teeth may feel extremely irritated even after the food item or liquid is not longer on your teeth.
  • Swollen Gums – If the gums around your infected tooth are swollen or that they feel tender when touched, this is yet another sign that you may need a root canal. Swollen gums can be painful and can cause all kinds of health problems and it is better if you deal with it now than waiting until later.

Catonsville Dental Care makes visiting the Dentist enjoyable!

If you have any questions about Root Canals or wish to schedule an appointment, please contact Leikin & Baylin Dental Care of Catonsville, Maryland by calling 410-747-1115 or visit CatonsvilleDentalCare.com. You can also follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

Don’t Forget: Leikin & Baylin Dental Care will donate $1 to the Catonsville Celebrations Committee for every new “Like” our Facebook page receives this month. So what are you waiting for!?

Source: How to Tell If You Need A Root Canal, eHow.com

How Do I Know if I Have a Cavity? FAQs answered by your Catonsville Dentist

Monday, January 14th, 2013

A cavity occurs as the result of tooth decay, which is the destruction of the tooth structure because of plaque buildup.

When foods containing carbohydrates are left on your teeth for an extended period of time, bacteria living in your mouth begin to digest this food, turning them into acids. Then, the acid mixes with the bacteria, food debris, and saliva to form plaque. It is this plaque that eats away at your tooth enamel, creating cavities.

How Do I Know if I Have a Cavity?

Symptoms of cavities include:

  1. Visible holes in your teeth
  2. Toothache
  3. Sensitivity to hots and colds

If you believe you have a cavity, the only way to know for sure is to visit your local dentist, like Dr. Leikin and Dr. Baylin here at Leikin & Baylin Dental Care of Catonsville, Maryland. We offer high quality, comprehensive dental care. We set a very high standard for our care and we are very proud of the treatment that we have provided for you.

“We are a team of caring health professionals who provide unparalleled dental excellence and treat our patients as members of our family.”

Despite being almost entirely preventable, cavities are the most common infectious disease among children. And, for the first time in 40 years, instances of cavities in children are the rise!

In addition to offering unequaled dental excellence, Dr. Leikin and Dr. Baylin also offer pediatric dental care, ensuring your child feels as comfortable as possible. We make going to the dentist fun for your child!

If you have any questions about Cavities and Oral Health or wish to schedule an appointment, please contact Leikin & Baylin Dental Care of Catonsville, Maryland by calling 410-747-1115 or visit CatonsvilleDentalCare.com.

You can also follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

Source: Dental Health and Cavities

ADA Attempts to Clean Up American Oral Hygiene

Friday, August 3rd, 2012

Though Americans are encouraged from a young age to keep their pearly whites squeaky clean, our track record when it comes to understanding oral hygiene isn’t so spotless. A recently released survey from the American Dental Association (ADA), has revealed that our citizens’ average score on survey questions regarding dental health was a little below average at a “D.”

The questions compiled in the survey were true and false, and a sampling of some of the ones Americans seemed to struggle with dealt with frequency of teeth cleaning, causes of cavities, and the age at which a child should make his or her first trip to the dentist.

The conditions of mouths nationwide should serve as a testament to the lack of knowledge regarding proper dental health care. Ninety percent of Americans between the ages of 20-64 have had cavities in their adult teeth, according to the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR). Children, too, who have not yet lost their baby teeth, have been found to have mouths crammed with cavities: nearly fifty percent of children between ages 2-11 have cavities.

ADA’s newly launched consumer website, Mouth Healthy, provides important information on preventative dental care and treatments; hopefully, the site will serve as a springboard for Americans in improving their dedication to oral care. To learn more about tooth care, and to see if you’re up to par on dental hygiene, visit Mouth Healthy’s website, and test your knowledge with their dental IQ exam.

Start showing an interest in your dental health today by scheduling a routine visit for preventative care with Leikin & Baylin Dental Care of Catonsville.

Leikin & Baylin Dental Care of Catonsville offers custom-fitted night guards, the most widely used treatment for bruxism. This device slips over the teeth, preventing contact with the opposing teeth, relieving the pressures of grinding and clenching.

If you have any questions about Preventative Dental Care or Routine Cleaning, or wish to schedule an appointment, please contact Leikin & Baylin Dental Care of Catonsville, Maryland by calling 410-747-1115 or visit CatonsvilleDentalCare.com.

“We are a team of caring health professionals who provide unparalleled dental excellence and treat our patients as members of our family.”

You can also follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

Sources

Oral Health – Americans Score Badly

Are Energy Drinks and Sports Drinks bad for your Teeth? :: Oral Health

Thursday, May 17th, 2012

A study published in the General Dentistry journal found that energy drinks and sports drinks both damage tooth enamel and boost the risk of cavities. And, just so you know , damaged tooth enamel cannot be fixed.

The sports drinks tested were:

  • Gatorade Rain
  • Powerade Option
  • Propel Grape
The energy drinks tested were:

  • Monster Assault
  • Red Bull
  • 5-hour Energy

These beverages, which are especially popular amongst teens and young adults, were tested for their effects on tooth enamel.

Researchers immersed enamel samples from extracted human teeth into three sports drinks and three energy drinks. These samples were immersed in the drinks for 15 minutes. Researchers then transferred the enamel to artificial saliva for two hours. This cycle was repeated four times a day for five days (with fresh drinks every day).

Researchers found that enamel loss was evident in just 5 days. The average enamel lost with sports drinks was about 1.5%, while the average loss with energy drinks was more than 3%.

Researchers also found the levels of acidity in the drinks to vary between brands and between flavors of the same brands. The energy drinks with the highest acidity include:

  • Red Bull Sugarfree
  • Monster Assault
  • 5-hour Energy
  • Von Dutch
  • Rockstar

Gatorade Blue had the highest acidity among sports drinks.

“The big misconception is that energy drinks and sports drinks are healthier than soda for oral health,” says researcher Poonam Jain, BDS, MPH, associate professor and director of community dentistry at the Southern Illinois University School of Dental Medicine. “This study completely disproves that, because they erode or thin out the enamel of the teeth, leaving them more susceptible to decay and sensitivity.”

Everyone, however, is not sold on the validity of the study. Tracey Halliday, a spokesperson for the American Beverage Association, takes issue with this study.

“This study was not conducted on humans and in no way mirrors reality,” she said.

If you have any questions about Dental Health / Oral Health, or wish to schedule an appointment, please contact Leikin & Baylin Dental Care of Catonsville, Maryland by calling 410-747-1115 or visit CatonsvilleDentalCare.com.

“We are a team of caring health professionals who provide unparalleled dental excellence and treat our patients as members of our family.”

You can also follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

Sources:

Energy Drinks: Bad for the Teeth?