Catonsville Dental Care

Dealing with Sensitive Teeth

Ouch! You experience a sharp pain whenever you take a drink of your ice-cold beverage. You just want to quench your thirst, but your Sensitive Teeth have other things in mind, namely pain. But why? Why are your teeth so sensitive and how can you deal with the pain?

Dealing with Sensitive Teeth

According to Mark S. Wolff, DDS, PhD, a professor and chair of the Department of Cariology and Comprehensive Care at New York University College of Dentistry, the source of your sensitive teeth could be caused by several different factors.

  1. Exposed Root: If the root structure is exposed, even a little, pain can quickly result. Gum recession or enamel erosion expose the dentin layer of the tooth, which contains millions of tiny tubules connected to nerve endings.
  2. Brushing Too Hard: Yes, brushing is good for your oral health. Yes, you can do it wrong. Brushing too hard can damage your teeth, slowly eroding the enamel layer of your tooth. “Harsh strokes wear away at the gum tissue as well as the tooth’s enamel layer, leaving each dentin tubule vulnerable to whatever it comes in contact with — hot, cold, soft, or hard,” said Wolff.
  3. Acidic Beverages: Acidic beverages – sodas, coffees, teas, juices, wines, etc. – can worsen enamel erosion.
  4. Tooth Whitening: Overuse of teeth whitening agents can further damage the enamel layer.

If you are experiencing sensitivity, schedule an appointment with your dentist at your earliest convenience. At Leikin and Baylin Dental Care in Catonsville, Maryland, our team of caring health professionals provides unparalleled dental excellence. We treat our patients as members of the family. And since most procedures are performed in our office, our patients rarely need to leave our careful eye.

If you have any questions about Dealing with Sensitive Teeth or wish to schedule an appointment, please contact Leikin & Baylin Dental Care by calling 410-747-1115 or visit CatonsvilleDentalCare.com. You can also follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

Sources:

When Heat and Cold Hurt Your Teeth WebMD