Archive for August, 2013

Dental Care Myth No. 1: You should brush after every Meal

Friday, August 30th, 2013

Brush after every MealFrom a young age, we are bombarded with dental care advice. Some of the advice is good. Other advice is dental care myth. So how do you separate the fact from the fiction? With the help of Leikin & Baylin Dental Care, of course! We are a team of caring health professionals who provide unparalleled dental excellence and treat our patients as members of our family.

Dental Care Myth No. 1: You should brush after every Meal

You know that brushing your teeth is important. In fact, it is the corner stone of any good oral care routine. But when should we brush? In the morning? At night? After every meal?

The Answers: Yes, Yes, and No.

The thinking behind brushing after every meal is sound. You want to protect your teeth and when better to do this then immediately after eating. However, brushing too soon after a meal can actually damage tooth enamel.

What!?

Yep! When you eat, your mouth produces certain acids, which temporarily soften your tooth enamel. Brushing too soon after eating can actually wear away protective tooth enamel, your mouths first line of defense against cavities. Brushing too soon also doesn’t give your mouth’s second line of defense, saliva, a chance to work either.

Did you know saliva actually contains some of the same enzymes used in detergent, called amylase, to break down starches? It’s true! According to author Mary Roach, who wrote the book Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal, saliva even contains antibacterial substances so effective that wounds in your mouth will actually heal twice as fast as those located outside of the mouth.

So, if you insist on brushing after every meal, you should wait at least 30 to 60 minutes before grabbing that toothbrush.

If you have any questions about Dental Care Myth No. 1: You should brush after every Meal, or wish to schedule an appointment, please contact Leikin & Baylin Dental Care of Catonsville, Maryland by calling 410-747-1115 or visit CatonsvilleDentalCare.com. We offer high quality, comprehensive dental care. We set a very high standard for our care and we are very proud of the treatment that we have provided for you.

You can also follow Laikin & Baylin Dental Care on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

Sources:

8 Popular Tooth Myths Debunked Popular Mechanics

Are Bleeding Gums a Sign of Gum Disease?

Wednesday, August 21st, 2013

Gum DiseaseYou wake up one morning, crawl out of bed, and walk downstairs as you struggle to keep your eyes open. You wander into the bathroom, half asleep, and reach for your tooth brush. You brush each and every tooth, making sure to scrub the tops and sides. Then, when you spit into the sink, you notice something: blood. Where is it coming from? Oh no, your gums are bleeding!

Are Bleeding Gums a Sign of Gum Disease?

When plaque is not removed from the teeth every day it will thicken and harden into tarter, which will inflame the gums and potentially lead to bleeding, a sign of gum disease. Also known as periodontal disease, gum disease is an infection of the teeth, gums and bone that surround the teeth.

Additional warning signs of gum disease include:

  1. Your gums appear very red and tender
  2. Your gums are swollen
  3. Your gums are pulling away from your teeth
  4. Your teeth feel loose
  5. Your bite feels as if it has changed
  6. You notice puss in between your teeth
  7. You suffer from chronic bad breath
  8. The fit of your dentures has changed

If you are experiencing bleeding gums or any of the above warning signs of gum disease, schedule an appointment with your dentist as soon as possible. If left untreated, gum disease can lead to receding gums and gum pockets, bone deterioration, and eventually, tooth loss. In fact, gum disease is the leading cause of tooth loss in adults.

Fortunately, gum disease is completely preventable. Regular good hygiene habits such as is usually enough to stall or stop gum disease in its tracks.

  1. Brushing your teeth at least twice a day, making sure to also brush your tongue, with fluoride toothpaste is recommended.
  2. Flossing at least once a day can prevent gum disease from happening.
  3. Making good food choices is another way to prevent gum disease. Eat a healthy diet and avoid foods that contain a lot of sugar.
  4. Regular Visits with your Catonsville Dentists can make all the Difference: At Leikin & Baylin Dental Care of Catonsville, we are a team of caring health professionals who provide unparalleled dental excellence and treat our patients as members of our family. We offer high quality, comprehensive dental care. We set a very high standard for our care and we are very proud of the treatment that we have provided for you.

If you have any questions about Bleeding Gums and Gum Disease, or wish to schedule an appointment, please contact Leikin & Baylin Dental Care of Catonsville, Maryland by calling 410-747-1115 or visit CatonsvilleDentalCare.com. You can also follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

Sources:

Dangers of Gum Disease WebMD

Sensitive Teeth: Increased Sensitivity to Hot and Cold

Friday, August 16th, 2013

Sensitive TeethOh boy, am I thirsty. This ice-cold glass of water is exactly what I need. Ouch! What was that? You ignore the sharp pain coursing through your tooth. So you take another sip…Ouch! What is going on?

Does the above scenario sound familiar to you? If so, you may have Sensitive Teeth. But why? Well the reasons vary from receding gums to the overuse of teeth whitening chemicals to diets high in acidic beverages to enamel erosion to overaggressive brushing. No matter the reason, the outcome is the same; the root structure of one or more teeth has become exposed.

Typically covered by the gums, the dentin layer contains millions of tiny tubules (or tubes), each of which is connected to a nerve ending. When exposed, these tiny tubules are rather sensitive to hot and cold temperatures.

Viola. Pain.

But don’t worry; you are not alone. According to a new survey published in the Journal of the American Dental Association, one in eight people has over-sensitive teeth. In fact, everyone is at risk, though certain groups are at an increased risk. These groups include:

  1. Adults between 18 and 44 were 3.5 times more likely than older adults to have sensitive teeth.
  2. Women are 1.8 times more likely than men to have sensitive teeth.
  3. Additional at risks groups include: those with receding gums and those who perform at-home tooth whitening.

If you suffer from sensitive teeth, talk to your dentist about possible treatment options. At Leikin and Baylin Dental Care in Catonsville, Maryland, our team of caring health professionals provides unparalleled dental excellence. We treat our patients as members of the family. And since most procedures are performed in our office, our patients rarely need to leave our careful eye.

If you have any questions about Sensitive Teeth, or wish to schedule an appointment, please contact Leikin & Baylin Dental Care of Catonsville, Maryland by calling 410-747-1115 or visit CatonsvilleDentalCare.com. You can also follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

Sources:

When Heat and Cold Hurt Your Teeth WebMD

Researchers discover Link between Dental Health & Alzheimer’s Disease

Tuesday, August 6th, 2013

Dental HealthAccording to researchers from the University of Central Lancashire School of Medicine and Dentistry, poor dental health, gum disease, and Alzheimer’s disease may be linked. While this is not the first study to predict a link between dental health and dementia, it is the first study to “pinpoint a specific gum disease bacteria in the brain.” Researchers found Porphyromonas gingivalis in four of their 10 donated brain samples and believe this bacterium may play a role in Alzheimer’s disease development.

“We are working on the theory that when the brain is repeatedly exposed to bacteria and/or debris from our gums, subsequent immune responses may lead to nerve cell death and possibly memory loss,” said Sim Singhrao, PhD, a senior research fellow at the University of Central Lancashire School of Medicine and Dentistry. “The future of the research aims to discover if P. gingivalis can be used as a marker, via a simple blood test, to predict the development of Alzheimer’s disease in at-risk patients.”

However, more research is needed. As St John Crean, dean of the School of Medicine and Dentistry, explains, the link between poor dental hygiene and dementia has yet to be proven.

“We don’t know whether the presence of these bacteria in the brain contributes to the disease, and further research will be needed to investigate this,” said Simon Ridley, PhD, head of research at Alzheimer’s Research U.K.

“This small study suggests that we need more research into this important area,” added Alison Cook, director of external affairs at the U.K.’s Alzheimer’s Society.

While there is still no definitive proof of the link between dental health and Alzheimer’s disease, one thing is for sure; good oral health is important.

If you have any questions about the Link between Dental Health, Gum Disease, & Alzheimer’s, or wish to schedule an appointment, please contact Leikin & Baylin Dental Care of Catonsville, Maryland by calling 410-747-1115 or visit CatonsvilleDentalCare.com. You can also follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

Sources:

Can Poor Dental Health Cause Dementia? WebMD

Pediatric Dentistry and Preventing Cavities in Children

Friday, August 2nd, 2013

Preventing CavitiesOver time, bacteria in the mouth produce excessive acid that contributes to the loss of tooth enamel, the hard mineral coat that covers the tooth. Without this protective layer, the tooth becomes vulnerable to tooth decay and cavities. The good news: cavities are entirely preventable. The bad news: cavities are still the most common infectious disease among children. What’s worse, cavities in children are on the rise for the first time in over 40 years.

As we said, cavities are entirely preventable. How?

  1. Brushing and Flossing: Your dentist has preached the importance of brushing and flossing time and time again and for good reason: they work. The best way to avoid cavities is to suppress bacteria in the mouth. This is most easily done by brushing twice a day, flossing once a day, and using mouth wash.
  2. Watch what you eat and drink: Sugary foods are a mouth’s worst nightmare. Sugary foods and drinks encourage bacterial growth and acid. Do your best to avoid these types of food and drink and you are one step closer to a cavity free existence.
  3. Regular Dental Visits: Finally, the last piece of the puzzle: the dentist. You should visit your dentist AT LEAST twice a year for regular dental cleanings and to screen for gum disease and so much more, like, you guessed it, cavities.

Pediatric Dentistry and Preventing Cavities in Children

Dr. Leikin and Dr. Baylin of Leikin & Baylin Dental Care in Catonsville, Maryland offer comprehensive dental care geared towards children and adolescents, including regular dental visits, preventative treatments, fillings, aesthetic restorations, mouth guards, and much more!

“We are a team of caring health professionals who provide unparalleled dental excellence and treat our patients as members of our family.”

It is our goal to make your child feel as comfortable as possible. Dr. Leikin and Dr. Baylin make visiting the Dentist Fun!

If you have any questions about Pediatric Dentistry and Preventing Cavities in Children, or wish to schedule an appointment, please contact Leikin & Baylin Dental Care of Catonsville, Maryland by calling 410-747-1115 or visit CatonsvilleDentalCare.com. You can also follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

Sources

Cavities Making a Comeback