Archive for June, 2013

Tips for Dealing With Bad Breath

Thursday, June 27th, 2013

Dancing the night awayIt is finally summer. You take your girl or guy out to a nice dinner, enjoy a romantic walk at beneath a beautiful sunset, and lean in for a kiss. Unfortunately for you, halitosis, the ultimate date ruining super villain commonly referred to as “bad breath”, ruins this otherwise fantastic moment. Luckily for you (or unluckily if you happen to be a victim of someone’s breath), this problem is fairly widespread. Here are a few tips for dealing with bad breath:

  • Cut out contributing factors: Dairy products, sugar products, onions, garlic, coffee, alcohol, and tobacco can all leave your breath smelling like a soggy gym sock. Food products can leave material that feed the bacteria that cause bad breath. Alcohol dries out your mouth, reducing saliva flow and creating opportunities for aspiring breath killers. Tobacco not only can cause cancer, but it can also allow bacteria to fester in your mouth.

  • Brush your teeth: It is simple, really, but the biggest thing you can do to fight bad breath is to brush your teeth. Not only does this help fight cavities, (which also create safe havens for bacteria) but taking a generous helping of toothpaste to your mouth will immediately (but temporarily) freshen your breath! While you have your toothbrush in there though, don’t forget to brush your tongue. You’d be surprised at the amount of bacteria your tongue can hold.

  • Be prepared: Sugar-free gum can be a lifesaver whether you’re hoping to seal the deal with the person of your affection or giving an important presentation at work. Regularly drinking water can also help wash away bacteria and food particles. Natural remedies, such as cloves, anise, cardamom, peppermint, or coriander can help as well. A quick application of whatever remedy you choose can temporarily stave off even the worst of bad breath.

  • Visit a doctor: Certain health problems, including diabetes, chronic bronchitis, gastrointestinal issues, and sinus infections can send your breath plunging to a level of stench you have never experienced before. If normal remedies do not adequately address halitosis, you may want to consider visiting a healthcare professional.

If you decide you would like to see a dentist about your breath, please do not hesitate to contact Leikin & Baylin Dental Care. We are a team of highly trained Catonsville dentists who will be more than happy to sit down with you about any of your dental needs. Whether the cause is tartar, cavities, or gum disease, we will help you identify it, treat it, and eliminate it.

If you have any questions about our blog, “Tips for Dealing With Bad Breath” or wish to schedule an appointment, please contact Leikin & Baylin Dental Care by calling 410-747-1115 or visit CatonsvilleDentalCare.com. You can also follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

Dealing with Sensitive Teeth

Wednesday, June 19th, 2013

Sensitive TeethOuch! You experience a sharp pain whenever you take a drink of your ice-cold beverage. You just want to quench your thirst, but your Sensitive Teeth have other things in mind, namely pain. But why? Why are your teeth so sensitive and how can you deal with the pain?

Dealing with Sensitive Teeth

According to Mark S. Wolff, DDS, PhD, a professor and chair of the Department of Cariology and Comprehensive Care at New York University College of Dentistry, the source of your sensitive teeth could be caused by several different factors.

  1. Exposed Root: If the root structure is exposed, even a little, pain can quickly result. Gum recession or enamel erosion expose the dentin layer of the tooth, which contains millions of tiny tubules connected to nerve endings.
  2. Brushing Too Hard: Yes, brushing is good for your oral health. Yes, you can do it wrong. Brushing too hard can damage your teeth, slowly eroding the enamel layer of your tooth. “Harsh strokes wear away at the gum tissue as well as the tooth’s enamel layer, leaving each dentin tubule vulnerable to whatever it comes in contact with — hot, cold, soft, or hard,” said Wolff.
  3. Acidic Beverages: Acidic beverages – sodas, coffees, teas, juices, wines, etc. – can worsen enamel erosion.
  4. Tooth Whitening: Overuse of teeth whitening agents can further damage the enamel layer.

If you are experiencing sensitivity, schedule an appointment with your dentist at your earliest convenience. At Leikin and Baylin Dental Care in Catonsville, Maryland, our team of caring health professionals provides unparalleled dental excellence. We treat our patients as members of the family. And since most procedures are performed in our office, our patients rarely need to leave our careful eye.

If you have any questions about Dealing with Sensitive Teeth or wish to schedule an appointment, please contact Leikin & Baylin Dental Care by calling 410-747-1115 or visit CatonsvilleDentalCare.com. You can also follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

Sources:

When Heat and Cold Hurt Your Teeth WebMD

How often should I see the dentist?

Tuesday, June 11th, 2013

Dental CleaningsWhen it comes to dental care, it seems like everyone has the same question; “How often should I see the dentist?” For years, the conventional wisdom was twice-yearly dental cleanings. Still, others prefer to go to the dentist once a year. Others go more frequently. So which is it: annual cleanings, bi-annual cleanings, cleanings every few months, or something completely different? Unfortunately, there is no one answer. The only one who can truly answer that question for you is your dentist. While once-a-year dental cleanings may be enough for some people, according to a new study published in the Journal of Dental Research, it may not be enough for others, especially those at risk of gum disease.

“Patients with one or more risk factors, which represent over half of the population, should visit at least twice a year and likely more in some cases,” said William Giannobile, study author and professor of dentistry and biomedical engineering at the University of Michigan.

Giannobile studied data from more than 5,100 adults who visited the dentist regularly for 16 straight years, had no history of gum disease, and received one to two cleanings annually. Researchers analyzed the link between the frequency of teeth cleanings and long-term tooth loss in the participants. They also considered risk factors of gum disease, such as smoking, diabetes, and genetics.

The Findings: How often should I see the dentist?

  1. Annual Dental Cleanings: Researchers found one cleaning a year to be sufficient for those with none of the aforementioned risk factors.
  2. Twice-Yearly Dental Cleanings: Receiving dental cleanings twice a year proved extremely beneficial for those with one or more of the aforementioned risk factors.

“The future of health care is personalized medicine,” said Giannobile. “This study represents an important step toward making it a reality, and in a disease that is widespread, costly and preventable.”

If you have any questions about our blog, “How often should I see the dentist?” or wish to schedule an appointment, please contact Leikin & Baylin Dental Care by calling 410-747-1115 or visit CatonsvilleDentalCare.com. You can also follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

Don’t forget, we will be donating $1 to the Catonsville Celebrations Committee for every new “Like” our Facebook page receives until June 15th. So spread the word! Time is running out!

Sources:

Annual Dental Cleaning May Be Enough for Some

Diet Coke is Bad for Teeth, According to New Study

Wednesday, June 5th, 2013

Diet CokeMethamphetamine and crack cocaine are known for their damaging effects to the mouths of drug users. But what about diet soda?

According to a study published recently in the journal General Dentistry, the heavy consumption of diet soda can damage the teeth as badly as methamphetamine or crack cocaine. Without good dental hygiene, continued exposure to the corrosive effects of the of citric acid and phosphoric acid in diet soda can cause significant oral damage.

“You look at it side-to-side with ‘meth mouth’ or ‘coke mouth,’ it is startling to see the intensity and extent of damage more or less the same,” said Dr. Mohamed Bassiouny, a professor of restorative dentistry at the Temple University School of Dentistry in Philadelphia.

In his study, Dr. Bassiouny studied a woman who drank 2 liters of diet soda every day for two to five years. He found that the woman experienced tooth decay similar to that of a “29-year-old methamphetamine addict and a 51-year-old habitual crack cocaine user.” The woman’s teeth were soft and discolored, with several teeth completely destroyed by erosion.

“From my experience, the damage that happens to people’s mouths from cocaine or methamphetamine are degrees greater than what I see from soda, but I see a lot of damage from soda,” said Dr. Eugene Antenucci, a spokesman for the Academy of General Dentistry.

Preventing Tooth Decay

The best way to fight tooth decay is to prevent it. You should pay particular attention to three things:

  1. How often you drink soda,
  2. How much soda you drink, and
  3. How long the soda is in your mouth

“You can help prevent [tooth decay] from happening by reducing any of those,” said Bassiouny.

“You’d be better off if you didn’t drink the soda,” said Antenucci, “but in my mind there’s not a reason for that extreme.”

If you have any questions about our blog, Diet Coke is Bad for Teeth, According to New Study” or wish to schedule an appointment, please contact Leikin & Baylin Dental Care by calling 410-747-1115 or visit CatonsvilleDentalCare.com. You can also follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+. And don’t forget, we will be donating $1 to the Catonsville Celebrations Committee for every new “Like” our Facebook page receives until June 15th. So spread the word!

Sources:

Diet Soda Habit as Bad for Teeth as Meth Addiction? WebMD